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Does Exercise Help With Depression?

Great information about how exercise can help combat depression. From Your Miami Personal Trainer and YourMiamiTrainers.Com

Hi I’m. Dr. Drew Ramsay reporting for Medscape psychiatry. I’m. An assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia. University exercise is one of those recommendations that clinicians love, but what’s? The evidence that exercise can help our patients with depression.

There’s, a wonderful new study and analysis of the the hunt study. This is a dataset of 33,000 healthy individuals that were in Nordic, read along Norway and they were followed starting in about 1985.

No, it’s, a very interesting study and if you’re interested in adding an exercise as a recommendation to your patients first, the Adventists now is is quite clear that it can help with the prevention of depression and also, as we Know it’s, a it’s, a recommendation that patients like and and can participate in right away.

So what happened? So 33,000 people followed over over 25 years? Initially, they were screened very carefully to make sure that they’re, healthy individuals who are being followed. So nobody who had a pre-existing condition of depression who was actively depressed and then they measured individuals, exercise habits and found that that even exercise at one.

But one and a half times a week had a significant effect in preventing depression over the course of the study about seven percent of the individuals became depressed and about almost 9 percent developed an anxiety disorder.

Now, interestingly enough, there wasn’t, really a protective effect of for anxiety. When it came to exercise, however, for depression there was they estimated that compared to individuals who did not exercise individuals exercising an hour or more a week, had a 44 % decreased odds ratio of getting depressed, so so quite a significant finding in the discussion they talked About that, if this were causal right, if depression was a causal, a factor in depression that about 12 % of cases could be prevented if all adults exercised for a little over an hour a week.

So how will this affect your clinical practice? Well, the first thing that I thought of was there the lack of a finding for anxiety, and perhaps one of those reasons. This is a study of prevention exercises, one of the most helpful tools I found clinically to help patients with anxiety, often something the patients report.

If they have some anxiety and after a workout, they feel great. Now there is some data, certainly showing that that anxiety can be helped or mitigated by regular exercise. But the findings here for depression are quite exciting and they give us a nice piece of evidence both for our own education.

The authors of the study do a very nice job talking about some of the physiological factors, for example individuals who exercise more to have a better autumn, nama christum tone, meaning that their heart rates a little bit slower and also discuss other physiological ways that exercise and Physical conditioning can relate to depression.

It’s, a great study. I encourage you to pick it up and then I’m curious. How do you integrate exercise into your practice? One of the other issues I considers was that, even though we’ve, we’ve known for quite a while.

That exercise can be helpful in mitigating depression. It’s, not something that we often teach residents it’s, not something that we often incorporate into practice. For example, in a standard psychiatric evaluation assessing our patient’s, exercise, routines and preferences is not something.

Traditionally we’re taught to do. I’d, suggest that now the evidence tells us that we should – and I’m – really curious how you’re, incorporating these findings into your clinical practice. I’m. Dr. drew Ramsey, Medscape psychiatry, you

Source : Youtube

Information courtesy of Medscape

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Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Great information from Alliance for Aging Research about good nutrition for a healthy life, worth a read. YourMiamiTrainers.Com.

From the minute we’re born, we’re aging. Constant exposure to our environment, the things we eat, and stresses from both inside and outside our bodies all cause us to age over time. Aging is highly complex, but scientists are starting to understand what happens at the cellular and molecular levels.

For example, healthy cells are damaged over time when our immune systems shift from reacting to short-term problems like injuries and infections, to gradually producing chronic inflammation throughout the body.

Time also gradually shortens the telomeres that act as protective caps for our DNA-containing chromosomes. These and other changes make our bodies less and less able to deal with stress from inside and outside of our body, so when damage reaches a critical level, our cells, tissues, and organs may no longer perform normally and our health starts to decline.

The changes associated with aging start to happen on some level at day one. We begin to experience their effects early in life. For example, we lose the ability to hear certain high-frequency sounds as teenagers, our cognition and memory slowly decline after they peak in our mid-20s, the strength of our bones starts to decrease in our 30s, female fertility sharply declines after 35, age-related near-sightedness begins in our mid-40s, and our hair starts to gray and thin as early as our 30s and 40s.

After the age of 50, the changes of aging become increasingly noticeable, and because aging is the biggest risk factor for most of the diseases that affect us as adults, the older we get, the higher our risk of chronic disease becomes.

While scientists have not yet found a way to stop these processes of aging, they are learning more and more about how to maintain health throughout our lives. Some aspects of aging are out of our control–like our genetics and our family history–but we can educate ourselves about moderate risk factors and do our best to reduce them through healthy lifestyle and diet choices.

Most of us can be healthy and active well into our later years, if we take care of ourselves. It’s no surprise that regular physical activity can help maintain a healthy weight, improve moods and sleep habits, and boost overall health.

And it’s clear that a well-balanced diet full or nutritious foods, is critical to good health. But when it comes to understanding which foods are the best choices, much nutrition research has focused on how certain foods or nutrients may have a negative effect on health, or even play a role in disease development.

More recently, scientists have begun to explore and understand how nutrition may play a role in promoting healthy aging throughout of all life’s stages. We are rapidly learning about what foods and nutrients should be emphasized in our diets, and how they can enhance our health.

Diets full of fruits and veggies, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and lean meats, have proven health benefits like lowering blood pressure, improving glucose control in diabetes, weight loss, improving arthritis, and reducing the risk of cancer and cardiovascular events, to name a few.

And we are learning more about the specific nutrients that can impact health. For example, plant pigments found in bright orange and red fruits and vegetables may prevent and slow the progression of eye diseases.

Calcium helps to keep bones strong. B vitamins play a role in maintaining brain health. And flavanoids from many plants may improve the health of our cardiovascular systems. The bottom line is that YOU have the power to maintain and improve your health, add vitality to your years, and reduce your risk of disease.

And it’s never too late to make a change. To learn more about the nutrients that are critical to your health, and how to safely turn to supplements if you aren’t getting enough of these nutrients in your diet, watch Healthy Aging With Nutrition

agingresearch.org/nutrition. from the minute we’re born we are aging constant exposure to our environment the things we eat and stresses from both inside and outside our bodies all cause us to age over time aging is highly complex but scientists are starting to understand what happens at the cellular and molecular levels for example healthy cells are damaged over time when our immune systems shift from reacting to short-term problems like injuries and infections to gradually producing chronic inflammation throughout the body time also gradually shortens the to Amir’s that act as protective caps for our DNA containing chromosomes these and other changes make our bodies less and less able to deal with stresses from inside and outside of our body so when damage reaches a critical level our cells tissues and organs may no longer perform normally and our health starts to decline the changes associated with aging start to happen on some level at day one we begin to experience their effects early in life for example we lose the ability to hear certain high-frequency sounds as teenagers our cognition and memory slowly decline after they peak in our mid-20s the strength of our bone starts to decrease in our 30s female fertility sharply declines after 35 age-related nearsightedness begins in our mid 40s and our hair starts to gray and thin as early as our 30s and 40s after the age of 50 the changes of aging become increasingly noticeable and because aging is the biggest risk factor for most of the diseases that affect us as adults the older we get the higher our risk of chronic disease becomes while scientists have not yet found a way to stop these processes of aging they are learning more and more about how to maintain health throughout our lives some aspects of aging are out of our control like our genetics and our family history but we can educate ourselves about moderate risk factors and do our best to reduce them through healthy lifestyle and diet choices most of us can be healthy and active well into our later years if we take care of ourselves it’s no surprise that regular physical activity can help maintain a healthy weight improve moods and sleep habits and boost overall health and it’s clear that a well-balanced diet full of nutritious foods is critical to good health but when it comes to understanding which foods are the best choices much nutrition research has focused on how certain foods or nutrients may have a negative effect on health or even play a role in disease development more recently scientists have begun to explore and understand how nutrition may play a role in promoting healthy aging throughout all of life stages we are rapidly learning about what foods and nutrients should be emphasized in our diets and how they can enhance our health diets full of fruits and veggies whole grains legumes nuts and lean meats have proven health benefits like lowering blood pressure improving glucose control and diabetes weight loss improving arthritis and reducing the risk of cancer and cardiovascular events to name a few and we are learning more about the specific nutrients that can impact health for example plant pigments found in bright orange and red fruits and vegetables may prevent and slow the progression of eye diseases calcium helps to keep bone strong B vitamins play a role in maintaining brain health and flavonoids for many plants may improve the health of our cardiovascular systems the bottom line is that you have the power to maintain and improve your health add vitality to your years and reduce your risk of disease and it’s never too late to make a change to learn more about the nutrients that are critical to your health and how to safely turn to supplements if you aren’t getting enough of these nutrients in your diet watch healthy aging with nutrition at WWE research organization [

Source : Youtube
Content created from Youtube Video courtesy of the Alliance for aging research.

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